Martyn Lewis Photography

Yorkshire based photographer - Weddings, Automotive, Landscape, Portrait & Studio Photography

Exige V6: A Sneak Preview.

clock January 30, 2012 23:16 by author Martyn

Took this shot back in November 2011 - Completely forgot to post it up, until I was asked to dig out some images for a magazine publication. Anyway...sifting through the shots from that evening, I came across this one. Despite the background distractions, and messy peripheral, I kinda liked the way it turned out:

Exige V6 Preview



Autumn Light: Part II

clock November 3, 2011 11:06 by author Martyn

Hope you like! "Burst" (the first of those), was featured on flickr's homepage yesterday - "Explored" - Quite pleasing when you see the web stats skyrocket for the days viewing figures!

Three more from the same stunning afternoon last weekend - Love the crispness of the first two of these, and the atmosphere of the third.

Exige in Yorkshire

Exige in Yorkshire

Exige in Yorkshire

 



Autumn Light

clock October 31, 2011 09:29 by author Martyn
It was a beautiful weekend up in Yorkshire, so I capitalised upon some free time and clear blue skies to head out into the Penines and capture a few shots before sundown. really pleased with the results. Got a feelign that they might make it into next years calendar shot shortlist!

Exige in Yorkshire

Exige in Yorkshire

Exige in Yorkshire



Mr & Mrs Driver - A Suffolk Wedding

clock October 25, 2011 07:30 by author Martyn

I haven't updated here much recently! And for that, I apologise! I've been far too busy, with the day job, embarking on the journey into parenthood (Yes, for those that hadn't heard via social networking, we're expecting our first in early April 2012! VERY exciting: Expect a flurry of "Anne Geddes" style shots, come April!!) and of course, editing wedding pics...

When you shoot around 2500 images per day at these things - the task of selecting, editing and delivering them is a daunting task! Trimmed to approximately 600 so far, I thought I'd best pop up a selection, for you all to see...

I shot Nicole and Kevins Wedding a while ago now and imminent delivery of the finished shots is upon them - soon after the wedding, I provided them with a sneak preview gallery, to keep them ticking over until I'd selected the rest... It's what I tend to do to keep the bride and groom, and often, more pressingly, their respective parents happy so that the B&G can enjoy the first few weeks of wedded bliss, without the constant nag of an in-law asking "where are the pictures"!! It's been a busy few months, but here's a selection of the first few shots I picked out from the beautiful wedding, in Suffolk:

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 

Nicole and Kevin

 



Underwater Adventures

clock August 16, 2011 08:00 by author Martyn

Before we visited Spain recently, I took the plunge and purchased an underwater housing for my Canon 5D Mk2. Knowing that it was exceptionally hot over there that week, I knew we'd be spending a LOT of time in the pool... what better way to capture some fun shots of the neice and nephew, than in a sub aqua setting!?

Searching around the web for a suitable casing, it became immediatley apparent that they were not cheap: The most reasonably priced "Hard Case" was around £1200 - only slightly less than the cost of the camera body its self! Then, while reading a random tweet from one of my many photographic contacts, I happened upon another solution: The Dicapac, a soft underwater housing good for up to 5m water depth. You can get the Dicapac in various sizes to suit different models of camera, from compacts to SLR's - I was interested in the DicaPad WP-S10, suited to larger DSLR bodies:

DicaPac

I did some research, and saw that there were many hundreds of satisfied customers. Still, would it feel right submerging a few thousand pounds of camera equipment, in what amounted to no more than a Zip-locked rubberised bag?! For £70, and a saving of £1130, I thought I'd take a chance. 

I ordered through Amazon, and as usual the fast delivery and ease of ordering paid dividends - it arrived within 2 days, all ready to head off to Spain.  Unboxing it, I was very impressed by the build quality - the thick rubberised casing seemed robust enough to take a few years abuse, while the front optics were perfectly clear.  I was initially worried about it's ability to hold my 5D with a larger lens attached, but my fears were set aside when I easily managed to fit the body, and then the Canon 24-70 f2.8 straight in, on maximum extension, with no fuss whatsoever.  The front housing, where the lens sits was ample enough to accomodate it, with room to spare.  I also switched to the 50mm prime lense, as it would probably be the one I used the most whilst in "watery situations".  The telescopic nature of the front aperture means that you can adjust the casing to suit different lenses.

So what's it like in use? Well, the images speak for themselves really - some fantstic shots in a reasonably controlled environment (unless your nephew is standing on your head whlie you're underwater!). I can't wait to get it in the waves to try and capture some images of surfers. Unfortunately, the beaches off Marbella weren't renowned for their big waves! (Might have to brave the North Sea!) The casing comes with a soft strap with robust clips to attach it to the casing - If I was shooting anwhere with a risk of the camera floating (or sinking!) away, I'd have used it more, but in practice, within the confines of a safe swimming pool with a maximum depth of 2.5m, i decided it was not necesasary.

The "finger apertures", giving you access to the lens are fiddly, particulary when using a bigger 72 mm diameter lens - they were much more suited to smaller diameters, such as a 52mm 50-200 on my back up camera set up.  The other "finger aperture" for the shutter release was excellent, allowing manipulation of the main "top side" functions on the 5D, and with a little more effort, the rear buttons.  One thing which was difficult, was using the "joystick" and rotational wheel on the back of  the camera body: I found it best to set up the camera completely before packing it into the case, and reviewing any of the shot images later on, rather than attempting to use the controls via the clear rear screen panel. (Other than of course, reviewing the last shot image, which I set for an 8 second review duration)

Packing the camera into the case: Really easy!

The best thing to do if using anything longer than a 50mm prime, is to remove the front cap from the Dicapac: it simply screws off. Then remove the lens fromt the body of the camera. Slide the camera body into the case, and re-attach the lense via the front aperture. At this point, you can adjust the length of the outer case, to suit your chosen focal length, replacing the front cap of the casing to make it water tight.  Positioning the case and camera on it's base you can then squeeze out as much of the surrounding air as possible - it makes it much easier to use when underwater, and prevents it from making a break for the surface, every tiem you relax!  On the top of the bag, is what can only be described as a robust version of a Zip-lock. Enough to keep water out alone, it's the further action of rolling it back over its self a couple of times, before securing it with the integral velcro, that provides the majority of it's water tightness. (I actually used a drinking straw, when the zip-lock was almost full closed to remove as much of the internal air as possible, before withdrawing it and sealing it up) Make sure it's sealed along the entire length, before rolling it again to seal/secure it with a further section of velcor running the width of the bag.  Believe me, it really is, watertight. (Still, I'd reccomend testing your packing skills with an empty case, and submerging it for a period of time, before you go dunking your 2k DSLR in the deepend, just to be on the safe side!)

Here are a couple of my favourites from the week:

Underwater adventures

 

Underwater adventures

 

Underwater adventures

 

Underwater adventures

 

Underwater adventures

Thinking of getting a Dicapac?  Here are my recommendations:

1. Make sure you remove as much surplus air as possible from the case when you seal it up - when you're under water it makes it much more usable and prevents it from constantly making a bee-line for the surface!

2. The finger apertures for "zooming" a lense were difficult to utilise with a 72mm diameter 24-70 - there really isn't enough room for rotation, once it's packed in, so set your desired focal length before you seal up the unit.

3. Ditch the strap if using it in a swimming pool! It's not going to go anywhere, and I found that a few amazing shots were ruined by a wayward strap floating into frame!

4. Make sure the lense aperture stays central over the internal lense - it will avoid vignetting in some images, particularly when shooting "wide".



About the author

Martyn Lewis grew up in Weardale, Durham, spoilt by the wonderful surroundings of the North Pennines.  He graduated from Newcastle University, before completing an MSc at Durham University in 2001.

 

 

Calendar

<<  January 2022  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456

View posts in large calendar

Sign in